TR2013-004

Privacy-Preserving Nearest Neighbor Methods: Comparing Signals without Revealing Them


    •  Rane, S.; Boufounos, P.T., "Privacy-Preserving Nearest Neighbor Methods: Comparing Signals without Revealing Them", IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, DOI: 10.1109/MSP.2012.2230221, ISSN: 1053-5888, Vol. 30, No. 2, pp. 18-28, March 2013.
      BibTeX Download PDF
      • @article{Rane2013feb,
      • author = {Rane, S. and Boufounos, P.T.},
      • title = {Privacy-Preserving Nearest Neighbor Methods: Comparing Signals without Revealing Them},
      • journal = {IEEE Signal Processing Magazine},
      • year = 2013,
      • volume = 30,
      • number = 2,
      • pages = {18--28},
      • month = feb,
      • doi = {10.1109/MSP.2012.2230221},
      • issn = {1053-5888},
      • url = {http://www.merl.com/publications/TR2013-004}
      • }
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  • Research Areas:

    Information Security, Multimedia


TR Image
An example of edit distance computation, in which "FAST" is one of strings owned by the server and "FIRST" is a string owned by a querying client.

Comparing two signals is one of the most essential and prevalent tasks in signal processing. A large number of applications fundamentally rely on determining the answers to the following two questions: (1) How should two signals be compared? (2) Given a set of signals and a query signal, which signals are the nearest neighbors of the query signal, i.e., which signals in the database are most similar to the query signal?